Thesis Title

Socioeconomic Status, Family Intactness and Perfectionism in a College Student Sample At-Risk For Developing Eating Disorders

Author

Kim L. Ingram

Date of Graduation

Spring 1996

Degree

Master of Science in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Committee Chair

Helen Schartz

Subject Categories

Psychology

Abstract

One hundred eighty-seven college students served as participants to investigate social class, family intactness, and perfectionism in relation to eating disorders. Of the 187 participants, thirty-three were classified as at-risk for developing eating disorders, according to the Setting Conditions for Anorexia Nervosa Scale (Slade & Dewey, 1986). All participants completed demographic questionnaires, the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale (Hewitt & Flett, 1991), and objective measures of perfectionism. Individuals at-risk for eating disorders displayed higher levels of perfectionistic characteristics as measured by the MPS than their peers who were not classified as at-risk. Furthermore, high levels of perfectionism in the at-risk group were attributed to socially prescribed perfectionism, rather than self-oriented perfectionism or other-oriented perfectionism. Results also revealed no significant differences between at-risk individuals and the comparison group on measures of social class and family intactness. In summary, the current study supports the association between perfectionism and individuals at-risk for developing eating disorders.

Copyright

© Kim L. Ingram

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Dissertation/Thesis

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