Thesis Title

The Ephemeroptera Larvae of Guatemala

Date of Graduation

Summer 1997

Degree

Master of Science in Biology

Department

Biology

Committee Chair

Steven Jensen

Subject Categories

Biology

Abstract

The aquatic insect order Ephemeroptera (mayflies) is a major constituent of stream, and in some cases, lake environments. Although the systematics of the order in North America is relatively well understood, the documentation of Latin American taxa has only recently begun in earnest. This study represents a preliminary study of the Ephemeroptera larvae known from the Central American country of Guatemala. Collections of mayfly larvae were made from 14 sites in four geographically isolated areas of the country. All specimens were compared to previously published records and descriptions of North, South, and Central American species. Descriptions are provided for specimens which do not coincide with those of previously known taxa. Descriptions are also included of collected species which have been previously documented to elucidate intra-specific population variability. Species previously collected in Guatemala but not collected during this study are included. Identification keys and illustrations are provided. All records of Ephemeroptera collected during this study represent new records for the collection sites. The genera Farrodes and Traverella (Leptophlebiidae), and Tricorythodes (Leptohyphiidae) increase the number of genera known in Guatemala from 21 to 24. The records of: Acerpenna pletura, Baetodes deludens, Baetodes pallidus, Camelobaetidius sinaloa, Camelobaetidius warreni, Thraulodes brunneus, Thraulodes packeri, Thraulodes zonalis, Thraulodes sp. C Allen and Brusca, and Traverella promifrons represent the first Guatemalan records for these species. Larvae which did not coincide with previous descriptions include species of the following genera: Camelobaetidius, Farrodes, Leptohypes, Tricorythodes, and Thraulodes. This study increases the records of Ephemeroptera species known for Guatemala from 39 to 56.

Copyright

© Bryan R Yates

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