Thesis Title

Movement and Life History Aspects of the Pygmy Rattlesnake in Southwest Missouri

Date of Graduation

Spring 1988

Degree

Master of Science in Biology

Department

Biology

Committee Chair

Don Moll

Subject Categories

Biology

Abstract

Individual pygmy rattlesnakes (Sistrurus miliarius) (N=7) were monitored with radiotelemetry in Christian and Taney Counties of southwest Missouri. Snakes were tracked for periods of 11-73 days and a total of 264 tracking days. Males exhibited significantly greater (P ﹥ 0.05) movement than females and non-gravid individuals displayed significantly more (P ﹥ 0.05) movement than gravid individuals. Except for tail length, S. miliarius exhibits little sexual dimorphism. Pygmy rattlesnakes feed mainly on small squamates but also prey on small mammals. Pygmy rattlesnakes are viviparous and also prey on small mammals. Pygmy rattlesnakes are viviparous and appear to be on a biennial reproductive cycle. Adult snakes are easily maintained in captivity and adult males exhibited higher average food conversion efficiency growth rates than adult females.

Copyright

© Thomas L Holder

Citation-only

Dissertation/Thesis

Share

COinS