Thesis Title

Hematoza of Wood Ducks (Aix Sponsa) in Missouri

Date of Graduation

Spring 1991

Degree

Master of Science in Biology

Department

Biology

Committee Chair

Lynn Robbins

Subject Categories

Biology

Abstract

A total of 317 wood ducks (Aix sponsa) from two localities in Missouri was examined for hematozoa in 1989 and 1990. Thirty seven (9.97%) harbored one or more blood parasites. Haemoproteus nettionis was the most common parasite, occurring in 36 (9.70%) of the birds. Leucocytozoon simondi was found in 2 (0.54%) and microfilaria occurred in 5 (1.35%) of the wood ducks that were examined. Prevalence data indicated that infections were higher in adults than in immature birds. There was no difference in prevalence between drakes and hens. Rates of infection did not vary between location or year. Seasonal prevalence indicated transmission did not occur at either location in the summer. Increased prevalence in the winter occurred as a result of northern wood ducks migrating into the sample areas. The proportion of northern wood ducks in the harvest at both sample localities was estimated using the model presented by Thul and O'Brien (1990).

Copyright

© Jeffrey Paul O'Dell

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