Thesis Title

Social Desirability And Self-Reported Embarrassing Behaviors: Computer-Assisted And Live Interviews Versus Daily Monitoring

Author

Michael Metz

Date of Graduation

Summer 2001

Degree

Master of Science in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Committee Chair

James Davis

Subject Categories

Psychology

Abstract

Accurate assessment is important for psychological research and applications. When behaviors are embarrassing accuracy may be compromised. Additionally, persons with higher levels of social approval might underreport the frequency of embarrassing behaviors. Which methods of assessment could be more accurate? In study 1, 16 behaviors were rated for embarrassment and frequency. Study 2 compares three self-reporting alternatives: 1, daily self-monitoring with web-based monitoring, 2, computer assisted interviews, and 3, live interviews. Self-monitoring demonstrated test-retest reliabilities ranging from .40 to .94, and compared favorably to subjective estimates of behaviors. Computer assisted and live interviews resulted in highly similar estimates of the embarrassing behaviors. However, both interview strategies produced lower frequencies of several behaviors than when reported during daily web-assisted self-monitoring. Participants' social desirability scores were not related to underreporting.

Copyright

© Michael Metz

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