Thesis Title

Perceptions Of Gender Differences In Filicide

Date of Graduation

Spring 2003

Degree

Master of Science in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Committee Chair

Donn Kaiser

Subject Categories

Psychology

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine wheather people attribute certain homicide motives to parents who kill their children. Ninety-nine participants read six scenarios depicting filicide and were asked to judge the role of five different motives, based on Scott's (1973) theory of filicide. Participants were assigned randomly to one of three groups. In group A, the offenders were depicted as males; in group B the offenders were depicted as females. The control group did not rate the scenarios, but completed the following scales along with groups A and B: demographic survey, Traditional Family Ideology Scale (TFI) and Sex Role Stereotyping Scale (SRSS). Analyses indicated no significant differences between male and female participants' rating of motive and no significant differences based on gender of the offender. Future research should focus on data collection from more diverse samples and improved scenarios.

Copyright

© Kimberly J. Benoit

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Dissertation/Thesis

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