Thesis Title

An Evaluation of a Self-Regulation Based Academic Recovery Program

Author

Logan R. Dale

Date of Graduation

Spring 2004

Degree

Master of Science in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Committee Chair

Thomas Kane

Keywords

academic recovery program, self-regulation, goal orientation, student-athletes, self-efficacy

Subject Categories

Psychology

Abstract

This research had two purposes. First, this research investigated what motivational factors predicted academic status of a student-athlete population. Second, this research tested whether a self-regulation based training program enhances the academic performance of an academically "at-risk" group of student athletes. To assess motivation causes of academic achievement, an academic questionnaire was administered to assess several demographic factors and motivational factors that were relevant to academic achievement. The motivational factors were drawn from theories of self-regulation (i.e., goal theory and goal orientation theory). For the 220 student-athletes who completed the academic questionnaire, goal difficulty and performance orientation predicted 'at-risk' status and semester academic performance. To assess the effects of a self-regulation based recovery program, 12 at risk students were randomly assigned to participate in a semester-long program designed according to self-regulation principles. The performance of the 12 students was evaluated according to how well they did when compared to a matched control group. Findings indicated that there were no significant differences between experimental and control participants' GPA.

Copyright

© Logan R. Dale

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