Thesis Title

The Relationship Between Body Checking Behaviors and Other Predictors of Eating Disorder Symptoms

Date of Graduation

Spring 2005

Degree

Master of Science in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Committee Chair

Brooke Whisenhunt

Keywords

body checking, dietary restraint, self-esteem, body dissatisfaction, eating disorders, females

Subject Categories

Psychology

Abstract

Body checking has been defined as a behavioral expression of the overevaluation with one’s shape or weight, and may include such behaviors as checking one’s body parts in the mirror, repeatedly weighing oneself, pinching one’s fat to determine how much is there, and monitoring the spread of one’s thighs when sitting down. Although many potential risk factors for eating disorders have been studied, the relationship between body checking and eating disorders has only recently been discussed by researchers. The process through which body checking interacts with other risk factors for eating disorders has only recently been discussed by researchers. The process through which body checking interacts with other risk factors had not been addressed in previous studies. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between body checking and eating disorder symptoms. Specifically, body checking was examined in conjunction with body dissatisfaction, self-esteem, and dietary restraint, variables shown in previous research to predict eating disorders. Path analysis was utilized to assess the appropriate fit of the model. Participants included 338 female undergraduates from Southwest Missouri State University. The questionnaires administered included a demographics questionnaire, the Body Checking Questionnaire, and Body Shape Questionnaire, the Body dissatisfaction Subscale of the Eating Disorder Inventory-2, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, the Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire-Restraint Scale, the Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire, and the Eating Attitudes Test-26. As hypothesized, body checking behaviors were found to be directly associated with eating disorder symptoms.

Copyright

© Laura B. Hoffman

Citation-only

Dissertation/Thesis

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