Date of Graduation

Fall 2012

Degree

Master of Science in Geospatial Sciences

Department

Geography, Geology and Planning

Committee Chair

Robert Pavlowsky

Keywords

streamflow, specific discharge, drainage area, runoff, ecoregion

Subject Categories

Hydrology | Natural Resources and Conservation | Water Resource Management

Abstract

Understanding Missouri's streamflow trends is important for conservation efforts by water resource managers and policy makers. Discharge characteristics for two Missouri ecoregions were evaluated using annual streamflow records from the USGS stream gage network. Records from 1981-2010 for a total of 20 gages in the Central Dissected Till Plains and 27 gages in the Ozark Highlands were analyzed. Records from 1925-2010 were compared at 12 sites. All gages used met the following criteria: continuous record, drainage area less than 3,000 square miles, and less than 15% urban. Discharge-drainage area regression equations were analyzed for the 2-year flood, 90th percentile, mean, 50th percentile, and 10th percentile flows. Results show that drainage area explains the majority of variation in discharge in both ecoregions (r2 ≥ 0.9) for the 90th percentile, mean, 50th percentile, and 10th percentile flows. Specific discharge is scale independent for in-channel flows, the 90th percentile, mean, 50th percentile, and 10th percentile flows. Including percentage of slope or land use improves the model in some cases. The 10th percentile flow or baseflow increased slightly from 1925 to 2010 in the Central Dissected Till Plains, possibly due to the influence of soil conservation.

Copyright

© Megan Colleen Harrington

Campus Only

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