Thesis Title

The Effects of Different Auditory Feedback Conditions on Speech Rate and Self-Perceptions of Speech

Date of Graduation

Spring 1993

Degree

Master of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders

Department

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Committee Chair

Klaas Bakker

Subject Categories

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Abstract

Fifteen non-stutterers orally read a standardized passage under six auditory feedback conditions: DAF; masking; 1, 3, and 5 millisecond delayed, amplified fundamental frequency; and normal auditory feedback. Dependent variabes were rate and self-perceptions of speech. Research hypotheses were: 1) any manipulation of auditory feedback affects rate and self-perceptions of speech in non-stutterers, 2) amplified phase-lagged fundamental frequency feedback affects rate and self-perceptions of speech differently than DAF and masking in non-stutterers, and 3) amount of phase-lag in the fundamental frequency feedback linearly relates to the amount of speech rate and self-perceptions of speech modifications in non-stutterers. Results indicated significant effects for Hypothesis 1 and 2. Findings were interpreted as: 1) any manipulation of auditory feedback affected rate and self-perceptions of speech in non-stutterers, 2) DAF and masking, rather than the fundamental frequency conditions, produced significant decreases in speech rate and dramatically affected most measured self-perceptions of speech in non-stutterers, and 3) the amount of phase-lag in the fundamental frequency conditions did not linearly affect rate or self-perceptions of speech in non-stutterers.

Copyright

© Rebecca Lynn Feeney

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