Author

Dániel Pap

Date of Graduation

Summer 2014

Degree

Master of Science in Plant Science (Biology)

Department

Biology

Committee Chair

László Kovács

Keywords

Vitis rupestris, population, rock grape, microsatellite, structure

Subject Categories

Fruit Science

Abstract

Grape breeding relies on traits introgressed from wild Vitis species. One of the most valuable genetic resources for hybrid grapevine and rootstock breeding is the rock grape (Vitis rupestris Scheele). This North American species, which was once common in eight states, now grows in natural populations only along streams and rivers on the Ozark Plateau, mostly in Missouri. Despite the rock grape’s prominent role in viticulture and its dwindling numbers, its population structure has not been studied in depth until now. In this study, several natural populations from Missouri and one from Oklahoma were examined. Genetic variation and population structure were estimated using microsatellite markers. The results indicate that V. rupestris populations are differentiated which may be the result of the populations' geographic isolation from one another and may potentially lead to genetic erosion in the species.

Copyright

© Dániel Pap

Campus Only

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