Thesis Title

Characterization of the Murine Macrophage Suppressor Factor (Msf)

Date of Graduation

Spring 1982

Degree

Master of Arts in History

Department

History

Committee Chair

James Moyer

Subject Categories

History

Abstract

Lymphokines are soluble substances produced primarily by lymphocytes and affect specific aspects of the immune process. Macrophage suppressor factor (MSF) is a lymphokine produced in the mouse spleen and is present in plasma. The in vitro target cell is the macrophage. The macrophage does not phagocytize as effectively in the presence of MSF. It was previously shown that the activity attributed to MSF can be removed by splenectomy. An in vitro assay was used which allows a determination of the phagocytic rate of the macrophage. The presence of MSF was apparent by noting a reduced phagocytic-rate of adherent peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) between 10-12 days post-splenectomy when compared to plasma from nonsplenectomized mice or the control. Production of MSF is resumed in the splenectomized mouse by 16 days post-splenectomy, apparently by non-splenic lymphoid tissue. MSF can be partially purified by ultrafiltration and column chromatography. The molecular weight was determined to be between 2,344 and 1,318.

Copyright

© Mary Ann Francka

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