Thesis Title

Evaluation of a College Reading Course By Comparing Grade Point Average and Attrition Among College Freshmen

Date of Graduation

Spring 1987

Degree

Master of Science in Education in Literacy

Department

Reading, Foundations and Technology

Committee Chair

Genevieve Cramer

Subject Categories

Other Education

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a college reading course as measured by subjects' semester grade point averages and attrition rate. The ex post facto investigation compared differences in mean grade point averages and attrition rates of high risk college freshmen between a group of participants and a group of nonparticipants. The participant and nonparticipant groups were the 37 students with scores occurring between 11-15 on the ACT composite and social studies subtests who took Reading 107 in their second semesters and those 78 students with scores occurring between 11-15 on the ACT composite and social studies subsections who did not take Reading 107 any of the three semesters under study. Two-way analysis of variance was the statistical test for grade point average, and the Chi-square test of independence was used to analyze the attrition factor. Although no statistical differences were found between the participant and nonparticipant groups in GPA or attrition, the results may have been skewed by a possible sampling bias in which nonparticipants seemed to have an academic advantage over the participants. A need for further study was indicated.

Copyright

© Rhonda Elaine Penn

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