Thesis Title

Self-Efficacy and Expectancy Manipulation By Telephone For Outpatients With Work Related Injuries

Author

Kay Purcell

Date of Graduation

Fall 1994

Degree

Master of Science in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Committee Chair

Harry Hom

Subject Categories

Psychology

Abstract

This study examined the effects of an expectancy manipulation by means by verbal persuasion via a brief telephone contact to injured workers during outpatient rehabilitation. Thirty-five individuals were randomly assigned to one of three groups: positive expectancy, neutral expectancy, and control. Measure of self-efficacy, social support, mood and pain were obtained before and after the telephone intervention. Outcome measures also included hassles and telephone effectiveness. Results indicated the positive and neutral expectancy groups reported significantly more confidence regarding rehabilitation than the control group when confidence was anchored to the telephone intervention with no significant differences between the expectancy groups. In addition, subjects who received the positive and neutral expectancy manipulation reported significantly decreased levels of pain when compared to controls. These findings support the effectivess of an expectancy manipulation by means of simple verbal persuasion via the telephone in this clinical population.

Copyright

© Kay Purcell

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Dissertation/Thesis

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