Thesis Title

Interrole Conflict, Time Demands, and Individual Differences

Date of Graduation

Spring 1994

Degree

Master of Science in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Committee Chair

Jeanne Phelps

Subject Categories

Psychology

Abstract

A sample of 130 college students completed a survey that included; (1) items written to develop an interrole conflict scale; (2) personality measures; (3) measures of time demands; and (4) demographic measures. Factor analyses were performed on the interrole conflict items. Four scales emerged that describe specific directions and sources of conflict. An increase in nonwork hours was related to a decrease in interrole conflict, suggesting that time spent in nonwork may have a protective effect. Hardiness and constructive thinking were significantly negatively related to the perception of interrole conflict. Constructive thinking moderated the relationship between time demands and the perception of conflict on one of the interrole conflict scales. Personality variables explained more variance in the interrole conflict scales than was explained by time demands. The results support the conception of interrole conflict as multi-dimensional and suggest that personality is predictive of perceptions of interrole conflict.

Copyright

© Michelle Evelyn Wood

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