Thesis Title

Effects of Congruence of Rater and Ratee Goals on Performance Appraisal

Date of Graduation

Spring 1999

Degree

Master of Science in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Committee Chair

Carol Shoptaugh

Subject Categories

Psychology

Abstract

In this study, several individual differences were explored as predictors of preferences for conforming with emotional display rules. It was hypothesized that extraversion, neuroticism, experiential openness and self-monitoring will relate to individuals' comfort in displaying emotional requirements. It was also hypothesized that the socialization component of conscientiousness and authoritarianism are likely to relate to individuals' willingness in displaying emotional requirements. A sample of 161 undergraduate students served as participants. The participants were required to attend one laboratory session where they received a consent form and completed the survey questionnaires. The questionnaires consisted of the Emotional Display Comfort Scale, the Emotional Display Willingness Scale, the NEO-PI-R, the Self-Monitoring Scale-Revised, and the Right Wing Authoritarianism Scale. Results show that extraversion and neuroticism predict individual comfort in exhibiting varying degrees of emotional display rules. Relationships between experiential openness and reported comfort as well as agreeableness and reported comfort supported hypotheses.

Copyright

© Jonna L Brooks

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Dissertation/Thesis

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