Thesis Title

Civilizing The Savage: The Women's National Indian Association, 1879-1901

Date of Graduation

Summer 1994

Degree

Master of Arts in History

Department

History

Committee Chair

Larry Burt

Subject Categories

History

Abstract

This thesis traces the growth and development of the Women's National Indian Association from its inception in 1879 to its transformation into the National Indian Association in 1901. These findings are based upon original research in primary resource material. The principal sources used include the WNIA's annual reports (1883-1901), its numerous publications and the writings of influential members, and its newspaper, The Indian's Friend. This organization had a tremendous impact upon the formation of government Indian policy, and received credit for spawning the General Allotment Act. The WNIA surged to the forefront of a movement on behalf of all-female missionary societies to become national in scope. The association's growth and achievement closely paralleled the health and activity of its dynamic leader, Amelia Stone Quinton. This thesis provides a case study into an organization that represents both an archetypical friends of the Indian group as well as a late nineteenth century female benevolent society.

Copyright

© Daniel L. Ragsdale

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