Thesis Title

Responses Of Cryptobranchus Alleganiensis Alleganiensis To Different Oxygen Concentrations, Temperatures And Photoperiod

Date of Graduation

Summer 1976

Degree

Master of Science in Biology

Department

Biology

Committee Chair

Robert Wilkinson

Subject Categories

Biology

Abstract

Cryptobranchus alleganiensis, a large aquatic salamander, was studied to determine if its underwater movements are respiratory in function. These animals also exhibit a side-to-side swaying motion, and various authors have suggested that this rocking is to produce a flow of water over the skin in order to enhance the exchange of gases. Tracings of the salamanders" movements were made on a physiograph, then the data were subjected to an analysis of variance. Eighteen salamanders were tested. They were divided into three groups of six animals, and each group was subjected to four different oxygen saturation levels (25 percent, 50 percent, 75 percent, 100 percent) and day and night photoperiods. Minutes moving, minutes rocking, periods of rocking, periods of moving, periods of quiescence, and number of rocks were recorded for each fifteen-minute period of each two-hour experiment. Results indicate that rocking and moving both may have a respiratory function.

Copyright

© David Arthur Beffa

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