Title

Academic advising: does it really impact student success?

Abstract

Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate academic advising in terms of student needs, expectations, and success rather than through the traditional lens of student satisfaction with the process.

Design/methodology/approach: Student participants (n=611) completed a survey exploring their expectations of and experience with academic advising. Principal axis factor analysis, multiple regression analyses, and analyses of variance were applied to student responses.

Findings: Six interpretable factors (i.e. advisor accountability, advisor empowerment, student responsibility, student self‐efficacy, student study skills, and perceived support) significantly related academic advising to student success. Differences emerged with regard to advisement of demographically diverse students.

Practical implications: The results suggest improvements in advising practices, particularly interventions focused on specific demographic populations.

Originality/value: The present study contributes to existing literature by expanding advising research beyond student satisfaction to explore how it influences student success. Additionally, results suggest a need for future research that further develops the concept and practice of quality academic advising.

Department(s)

Psychology

Document Type

Article

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1108/09684881311293034

Keywords

advising, academic advising, retention, matriculation, student success, perceived support, self-efficacy, student expectations, higher education, students

Publication Date

2013

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