Title

Methamphetamine Exposure, Iron Deficiency, and Implications for Cognitive-Communicative Function: A Case Study

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2009

Abstract

Methamphetamine (meth) exposure during fetal development has the potential to adversely affect the development of multiple organ systems. An interdisciplinary case study of a 4-year 11-month-old child born to a mother addicted to meth revealed significant cognitive and communicative delays. Possible meth-related consequences for these delays included stroke in utero with associated hemiparesis and epilepsy, congenital eye dysfunction, recurrent middle ear infections, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), social adjustment problems, and parental neglect. An important additional finding was the child's nondietary iron deficiency anemia, which could contribute to or compound meth-related behavioral problems. The influence of chronic iron deficiency anemia on cognitive-communicative function speaks to the importance of including dietitians in the interdisciplinary team assessment of children exposed to meth.

Recommended Citation

Goldberg, Lynette R., Cynthia J. Heiss, Letitia White, Wafaa A. Kaf, Alan Becker, Jessica B. Schindler, Nancy Dion, and Jill Oswalt. "Methamphetamine Exposure, Iron Deficiency, and Implications for Cognitive-Communicative Function: A Case Study." Communication Disorders Quarterly 31, no. 3 (2010): 183-192.

DOI for the article

10.1177/1525740109340437

Department

Communication Sciences and Disorders

Share

COinS