Title

Effects of voluntary and forced exercise on plaque deposition, hippocampal volume, and behavior in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2009

Keywords

Alzheimer's disease, voluntary exercise, forced exercise, Tg2576, object recognition, hippocampal volume

Abstract

We examined the effects of voluntary (16 weeks of wheel running) and forced (16 weeks of treadmill running) exercise on memory-related behavior, hippocampal volume, thioflavine-stained plaque number, and soluble Aβ levels in brain tissue in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Voluntary running animals spent more time investigating a novel object in a recognition memory paradigm than all other groups. Also, voluntary running animals showed fewer thioflavine S stained plaques than all other groups, whereas forced running animals showed an intermediate number of plaques between voluntary running and sedentary animals. Both voluntary and forced running animals had larger hippocampal volumes than sedentary animals. However, levels of soluble Aβ-40 or Aβ-42 did not significantly differ among groups. The results indicate that voluntary exercise may be superior to forced exercise for reducing certain aspects of AD-like deficits — i.e., plaque deposition and memory impairment, in a mouse model of AD.

Recommended Citation

Yuede, Carla M., Scott D. Zimmerman, Hongxin Dong, Matthew J. Kling, Adam W. Bero, David M. Holtzman, Benjamin F. Timson, and John G. Csernansky. "Effects of voluntary and forced exercise on plaque deposition, hippocampal volume, and behavior in the Tg2576 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease." Neurobiology of disease 35, no. 3 (2009): 426-432.

DOI for the article

10.1016/j.nbd.2009.06.002

Department

Biomedical Sciences

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