Title

Attributional Training Versus Contact in Acculturative Learning: A Laboratory Study

Abstract

A culture assimilator, a programmed learning technique for teaching about another culture, was combined with behavioral contact to test for the joint effectiveness of the two approaches to acculturative training. A total of 45 White male college students were randomly assigned to five training conditions in a modified Solomon four‐group design. Results indicated significant differences between trained and untrained S s on knowledge of Black culture and better behavioral performance (as rated by Black confederates who were blind as to the training conditions) for S s receiving assimilator training followed by contact than the reverse condition. Apparently, the assimilator provides an opportunity to consolidate new attributions prior to their use in a real interaction. The reverse pattern (interaction before the formation of new attributions) is seen as anxiety producing and a test for the role of anxiety in intercultural training was generally positive. Possible implications of the results for cross‐cultural training theory and methodology are discussed.

Department(s)

Counseling, Leadership, and Special Education

Document Type

Article

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1559-1816.1985.tb02266.x

Publication Date

6-7-1905

Journal Title

Journal of Applied Social Psychology

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