Thesis Title

Splenic Regulation Of Macrophage Activity In Mice Infected With Listeria Monocytogenes

Date of Graduation

Summer 1980

Degree

Master of Science in Biology

Department

Biology

Committee Chair

Richard Myers

Subject Categories

Biology

Abstract

Splenectomized mice are more resistant than normal mice to challenge by Listeria monocytogenes. The regulatory role of the spleen over macrophage activation in mice was investigated. The macrophage migration inhibition test was used to measure in vitro macrophage activity. Macrophages from splenectomized, infected mice were shown to have increased migration and therefore increased activation over macrophages from normal infected mice. The effect of plasma from Listeria infected mice on splenectomized mice was tested. It was shown that immune plasma had no effect on macrophage migration. Results indicate the macrophage is responsible for increased resistance to Listeria infection in the splenectomized mouse. The increased activation seen could result from an increase in migration inhibitory factor (MIF) production or the production of macrophage activation factor (MAF) or both. A possible role for MIF, MAF, and B cells is discussed.

Copyright

© Nancy Ann Cavender

Citation-only

Dissertation/Thesis

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