Thesis Title

A Study of the Life History and Larval Productivity of Corydalus Cornutus Linnaeus (Megaloptera: Corydalidae) in Southwest Missouri

Date of Graduation

Spring 1989

Degree

Master of Science in Biology

Department

Biology

Committee Chair

Don Moll

Subject Categories

Biology

Abstract

The life history and productivity of Corydalus cornutus Linne. was studied from September 9, 1982 to September 29. 1983. C. cornutus LInne. is univoltine. Eggs are laid on structure over running water in June. First-instar larvae emerge in July. Emergence is asynchronous. Larvae pass through ten instars during their development, and may have an additional three if forced to remain on the riffle for an additional nine months. Larvae remain on riffles until late May-early June. Pupae are terrestrial, forming a soft exuviate sac underground. Winged adults emerge fertile, and make shortly thereafter. The life cycle is completed in a minimum of 12 months, but may require 21 months for larvae born late in the recruitment period. Annual production was 1.9g/sq m. Average annual standing crop was 0.367g/sq m. The turnover ration was 5.2.

Copyright

© Ronald I Carr

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Dissertation/Thesis

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