Thesis Title

Developmental Advisement and Goal Theory: Enhancing Student Motivation and Goal Achievement

Date of Graduation

Spring 2005

Degree

Master of Science in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Committee Chair

Carol Shoptaugh

Keywords

goals, advisement, academic achievement, goal commitment, motivation

Subject Categories

Psychology

Abstract

This was an empirical investigation of the effects of goal-setting strategies integrated into developmental advisement sessions on goal commitment and achievement. Using the goal theory framework, participants’ goals were manipulated within private academic advisement sessions or in a training session. It was hypothesized that the advisement would increase goal commitment and subsequent goal achievement when compared to the training and control conditions. In a sample of 98 participants, academic advisement and training conditions were shown to increase goal dimensions; however, there were no significant differences among conditions on goal commitments or goal achievement. Exploratory analyses of motivation variables (self-efficacy, confidence, importance, effort) yielded no significant differences among conditions. While quantitative results imply human contact/individualized attention may not be necessary for goal clarification and goal achievement, the qualitative responses indicated differences between conditions in individual learning and benefits.

Copyright

© Kelly R. Sowers

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Dissertation/Thesis

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