Thesis Title

The Human-Canine Bond: Differential Effects of Pet Presence on Family Communication

Date of Graduation

Summer 1995

Degree

Master of Arts in Communication

Department

Communication

Committee Chair

Charlene Berquist

Subject Categories

Communication

Abstract

In an attempt to assess the effects of the human-canine bond on family communication, this thesis presents an analysis of 12 open-ended interviews with families from 4 stages of the family life cycle : newly married couples with no children, single parent families, traditional families with children in the home, and empty nest families. Adult participants also responded in written form to the Adapted Dog Attitude Inventory. The data reveal family-of-origin influences one's decision to acquire a dog and integrate it into the family system, dogs play roles in the family which are surrogates for human roles, the roles played by the dog change to reflect the needs of the family, and dogs play a central role, both in facilitating and inhibiting in family communication.

Copyright

© Jennifer Sak Jackson

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Dissertation/Thesis

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