Author

James Gilmore

Date of Graduation

Summer 2015

Degree

Master of Global Studies

Department

History

Committee Chair

David Romano

Keywords

behavior, conflict, simulation, game, decision-making, war game, violence

Subject Categories

International and Area Studies

Abstract

Simulations and war games have seen increasing use not only in the military, but various other agencies throughout the United States Federal Government as well. There seems to be a gap in the relevant literature examining if there are any effects on foreign policy decision-making after participating in these games, however. I deployed a survey at a local paintball place, to test for any noticeable effect on people's foreign policy preferences after they take part in a conflict simulation. The results of my research demonstrated a greater need to examine the effects of conflict simulations on decision-making processes. Some of the changes included a willingness to utilize a more militant foreign policy when dealing with a situation such as the Arab Spring, or having a more aggressive emotional state after participating in a conflict simulation.

Copyright

© James Gilmore

Open Access

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