Thesis Title

Aversive Discrimination in the Employment Interview: the Effects of Organizational Policies and Accountability Pressures

Date of Graduation

Summer 2002

Degree

Master of Science in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Committee Chair

Robert Jones

Subject Categories

Psychology

Abstract

The effects of hiring norms and policies on ratings of a gay job candidate were explored using aversive racism theory. Ninety undergraduate participants from a Midwestern university rated a moderately performing department head job candidate (gay vs. non-gay) after receiving information about the position. Some participants were told their ratings would remain anonymous (no mitigating factor), some were given additional information about job-related hiring (egalitarian norm), and some received this additional training and were told they would have to explain their ratings verbally (accountability). As expected following aversive racism theory, participants rated the gay candidate less positively than the non-gay candidate despite reporting less heterosexist attitudes. Contrary to hypotheses, the mitigating situational factors did not influence participants' ratings of the gay candidate. Despite limitations of the study, organizations may need to consider other ways to mitigate discriminatory hiring decisions.

Copyright

© Jeffrey Grebinoski

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