Thesis Title

The Problem Of Human Rhetoric In C.S. Lewis' Space Trilogy

Author

Rod C. Taylor

Date of Graduation

Spring 1999

Degree

Master of Arts in English

Department

English

Committee Chair

William Burling

Subject Categories

English Language and Literature

Abstract

When C.S. Lewis wrote Out of the Silent Planet, Perelandra, and That Hideous Strength, often termed the "Space Trilogy," he clearly had a specific purpose in mind. Through letters to friends and colleagues, he revealed the subtle presentation of his theological beliefs in these novels concerning humans and their place and purpose within the universe. As a result of Lewis' letters being published, critics are now able to understand his purpose, and therefore much has been written concerning the success of this purpose. There still remains, however, much to be examined in these novels, especially in the area of language. By a detailed examination of Lewis' use of language in both the narrative voice and the voices of the characters, this thesis seeks to uncover one of the more subtle but important messages Lewis was presenting within the trilogy, namely his concern with the problems and limitations of "human rhetoric."

Copyright

© Rod C. Taylor

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Dissertation/Thesis

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