Title

Customer Self-Efficacy and Response to Service

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2006

Keywords

service self-efficacy, value, voice, exit, loyalty, word of mouth, Hirschman

Abstract

The customers’ role is significant in the delivery and consumption of many types of services. This study examines customers’ beliefs about their ability to participate in a service (service use self-efficacy) and its effect on response to service. A theoretical model is proposed that explains how self-efficacy affects customers’ perceptions of service value and complaint intentions (“voice”). These factors, in turn, predict exit intentions and positive word of mouth. The model is tested on a sample of 444 members of a group insurance plan. The results of a structural equation model confirm the hypothesized relationships. The findings suggest that service managers should take steps to increase customer service use self-efficacy, such as providing training with feedback, vicarious experiences (e.g., print or video portrayals of successful service experiences), verbal persuasion (e.g., “You can do this”-type coaching), and a low-stress environment. It is also important to develop varied opportunities for customer comments.

Recommended Citation

McKee, Daryl, Christina S. Simmers, and Jane Licata. "Customer self-efficacy and response to service." Journal of Service Research 8, no. 3 (2006): 207-220.

DOI for the article

10.1177/1094670505282167

Department

Marketing

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